Average Ticket Prices
Dixie Chicks $66.67      Florida Georgia Line $44.22      Dark Star Orchestra $28.97      Matt Nathanson $35.32      Kevin Gates $29.34      Kansas $55.00      Stick Figure $17.16      Muuy Biien $8.27      The Great Zucchini $4.95      "Honda Civic Tour" $57.79      Amy Grant $52.76      Atmosphere $32.01      Gavin DeGraw $45.27      Black Sabbath $71.12      STS9 $33.58      Death Cab For Cutie $36.85      Pentatonix $54.83      Straight No Chaser $46.55      Yonder Mountain String Band $25.75      Vince Gill $62.34      Brantley Gilbert $34.58      Steve Miller Band $59.16      David Bazan $17.80      Guns N' Roses $115.55      Rusted Root $29.05      "A Night With Janis Joplin" $49.61      Jesse Cook $39.59      Coldplay $96.32      Bob Dylan $81.03      Lucero $23.24      The Floozies $22.39      Big Gigantic $32.76      Yellowcard $28.07      Luke Bryan $59.35      Mumford & Sons $48.73      Daughter $20.83      Big Daddy Weave $24.76      Kristin Chenoweth $76.93      O.A.R. $37.29      Santigold $28.36      Andy McKee $26.95      Lil Wayne $50.46      Josh Ritter $33.60      J.J. Grey & Mofro $31.84      Chris Young $41.60      Keith Urban $50.92      Between The Buried And Me $24.74      Plants And Animals $14.28      The Moody Blues $74.78      Il Volo $61.13      
See all average ticket prices

Hip-Hop Pioneer Robinson Dies

06:01 AM Friday 9/30/11 | |

The woman some call the mother of hip-hop has died.

Sylvia Robinson, who had a hit as a singer-songwriter with the sexually charged “Pillow Talk” but was later known as one of hip-hop’s early founders as the record label owner that put out “Rapper’s Delight,” rap’s first mainstream success, died Thursday, according to publicist Greg Walker. She was 76.

Robinson, born Sylvia Vanterpool, died of congestive heart failure at the New Jersey Institute of Neuroscience in Seacaucus, N.J.

Along with her late husband, Joe, Robinson was the owner of Sugar Hill Records. In 1979, it released the song that would become widely known as rap’s first hit, “Rapper’s Delight,” by The Sugarhill Gang.

The song was released as hip-hop was just beginning to emerge as a genre; for the most part, it was a budding phenomenon bubbling on New York City streets. Robinson recognized the potential of the music and wanted her struggling label to capitalize on it.

“She saw where a DJ was talking and the crowd was responding to what he was saying, and this was the first time she ever saw this before,” her son Joey said in a 2000 interview with NPR. “And she sad Joey, wouldn’t this be a great idea to make a rap record?”

It turned out she was right. After gathering three rappers (Master Gee, Wonder Mike and Big Bank Hank) to record the 15-minute song, the party groove became a sensation. The condensed version was considered the first rap song to get radio play and reached the top 40 on Billboard’s Hot 100 chart.

The Sugar Hill Gang faded into rap history, not recording other songs that would match its original flourish. But Sugar Hill Records would continue to play a part on the early years of hip-hop with a roster that included Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five.

Robinson’s roots in the record industry were deep. She was a blues singer in the 1950s, recording for Columbia and Savoy Records on songs like “Chocolate Candy Blues.” Later, she was part of the duo “Mickey & Sylvia.”

But she had perhaps her biggest hit as a solo artist with “Pillow Talk,” a seductive song released in 1973. Robinson was also a producer and songwriter for others.

She is survived by three sons and several grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Comments