Average Ticket Prices
Greensky Bluegrass $20.22      Cherub $17.61      George Thorogood & The Destroyers $49.45      The Tragically Hip $56.32      The Lone Bellow $19.53      Demi Lovato $46.15      The Decemberists $38.28      Rittz $21.64      Silverstein $18.34      Rodney Carrington $47.34      Dave Matthews Band $58.01      Keb' Mo' $41.47      George Clinton And Parliament Funkadelic $31.99      Citizen Cope $39.71      Straight No Chaser $42.87      They Might Be Giants $24.08      Ryan Adams $44.76      The "Happy Together" Tour $43.55      2Cellos $37.77      Twiddle $15.55      Stars $24.80      Shovels & Rope $22.37      Carbon Leaf $21.42      Moon Hooch $11.58      Enrique Iglesias $83.01      G-Eazy $26.56      Tech N9ne $30.26      Mary Chapin Carpenter $48.70      The Devil Wears Prada $19.80      Boz Scaggs $62.69      Lyle Lovett $58.97      Napalm Death $19.90      Get The Led Out - American Led Zeppelin $28.88      Colin Mochrie & Brad Sherwood $39.28      Dan + Shay $17.62      Between The Buried And Me $21.25      Justin Townes Earle $24.57      Hunter Hayes $40.97      John Mellencamp $89.76      Martin Sexton $35.94      Lecrae $28.42      Ian Anderson $67.11      Crosby, Stills & Nash $72.76      Imagine Dragons $52.74      Porter Robinson $34.27      Chris Brown $97.42      Paper Diamond $22.74      Kenny Chesney $83.97      Yelawolf $22.82      Ray LaMontagne $55.77      
See all average ticket prices

Jazz, TV Composer Pete Rugolo Dies At 95

09:31 AM Tuesday 10/18/11 | |

Pete Rugolo, an Emmy- and Grammy-winning composer and arranger who worked with greats such as Miles Davis and Benny Goodman, has died. He was 95.

A family spokeswoman says Rugolo died Sunday in the Sherman Oaks area of Los Angeles.

Rugolo was chief arranger for Stan Kenton’s orchestra after World War II, helping develop its progressive jazz sound.

He later was musical director for Capitol Records, where he signed Peggy Lee, Mel Torme and others. He produced the Miles Davis “Birth of the Cool” sessions and Harry Belafonte’s first singles.

In the 1950s, he got into the movie and TV business while also recording his own albums. He co-wrote the theme for TV’s “The Fugitive” and wrote themes or other music for many shows, including “Run for Your Life.”

Comments



Artists Mentioned in this article