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Jazz, TV Composer Pete Rugolo Dies At 95

09:31 AM Tuesday 10/18/11 | |

Pete Rugolo, an Emmy- and Grammy-winning composer and arranger who worked with greats such as Miles Davis and Benny Goodman, has died. He was 95.

A family spokeswoman says Rugolo died Sunday in the Sherman Oaks area of Los Angeles.

Rugolo was chief arranger for Stan Kenton’s orchestra after World War II, helping develop its progressive jazz sound.

He later was musical director for Capitol Records, where he signed Peggy Lee, Mel Torme and others. He produced the Miles Davis “Birth of the Cool” sessions and Harry Belafonte’s first singles.

In the 1950s, he got into the movie and TV business while also recording his own albums. He co-wrote the theme for TV’s “The Fugitive” and wrote themes or other music for many shows, including “Run for Your Life.”


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