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Viagogo Fails To Block TV Allegations

02:01 PM Thursday 2/23/12 |   |

Viagogo has failed to prevent the UK’s Channel 4 from screening a TV programme alleging the ticket reseller is breaching the country’s consumer legislation.

Viagogo’s bid to get an injunction preventing the station from airing “Dispatches,” its investigative documentary programme, was tossed by the High Court Feb. 22.

The programme is called “The Great Ticket Scandal” and was scheduled to air the following day.

“We sought an injunction to prevent customer information being made public,” says Viagogo UK director Edward Parkinson. “Our No. 1 priority is to protect our customers’ data, so we will always do whatever we can to prevent that information from falling into the wrong hands.”

The programme was expected to accuse the company, which operates as a fan-to-fan site, of getting most of its inventory from professional ticket resellers or direct from concert promoters.

It claims Viagogo staff competes directly with real fans to buy tickets as soon as events go on sale.

“Dispatches” says this could explain the claim that many shows go on sale at high prices on ticket reselling websites within minutes of selling out.

It also says Viagogo’s team slips through the net put in place to prevent the bulk buying of tickets by using multiple credit cards registered to different addresses.

This special team is allegedly dealing with large-scale ticket resellers who supply a significant percentage of overall ticket sales on the Viagogo exchange.

Parkinson said his company exists to provide a safe, secure marketplace for the buying and selling of live event tickets.

“The vast majority of sellers are individuals, and around half of tickets sold sell for face value or less,” he explained. “To ensure we can offer the best seats possible, we have on occasion partnered with promoters or artists as this enables us to go above and beyond for our customers.”

Viagogo is believed to be considering an appeal against High Court and Appeal Court rulings ordering it to avoid reveal who has been offering rugby football tickets on its website.

On Dec. 9, the Appeal Court backed the decision reached last March by High Court judge Mr. Justice Tugendhat, who ruled that Viagogo must reveal the names and addresses of those who placed tickets for sale on its website for the 2010 Investec internationals and the 2011 Six Nations Championship.

“Placing tickets for sale on secondary ticketing sites is in direct contravention of the Rugby Football Union’s ticketing terms and conditions, and if the seller can be identified, they face tough sanctions including possible court action,” RFU representative Sophie Goldschmidt said following the organisation’s latest court victory.

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